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On Monday, August 21, 2017 the Yellowstone Teton Territory area will experience a Full Solar Eclipse resulting in great memories with this once in a lifetime opportunity!

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Culture and History

Immerse yourself in art, music, dance, theater, and more in Eastern Idaho. The region is packed with opportunities to enjoy a wide array of cultural events and experiences. Attend art shows, theatrical performances, concerts, and more.

Delve into museums with hand-on exhibits about everything from the birth of television, to the history of early combat aircraft, to the tragic Teton Dam Flood disaster. Ride a historic carousel or visit one of the region's illustrious national parks and monuments, including Craters of the Moon National Monument, Grand Teton National Park, and Yellowstone National Park. Or spend time exploring your own family's history at one of the Family History Centers in the region, where you can conduct research or learn more about how to get started learning about your family's past.

Cultural Attractions

Experience a wide array of cultural events, attractions, and festivities in Eastern Idaho. Yellowstone Teton Territory is home to a wide variety of museums, including the Museum of IdahoArt Museum of Eastern Idaho, Farnsworth TV and Pioneer Museum, Idaho Museum of Natural History, Legacy Flight Museum, and even the Idaho Potato Museum.

Explore the event calendars at Idaho Falls Arts Council, Willard Arts Center, and the Idaho Falls Symphony for a taste of upcoming performances and other events. Also be sure to check out the Yellowstone Teton Territory listings to explore more of the cultural enrichment options available in the region. 

Idaho International Dance Festival

Every year, dancers from around the world come to Rexburg to share their culture through dance, music, and interactive events at the Idaho International Dance Festival. Since the festival began in 1986, performers from over 70 countries have traveled to Rexburg to share their cultural traditions and perform. Participants typically stay with host families and make interpersonal connections, fostering understanding between cultures. Events include gala performances, cultural outreach, a street festival, and more. Don't miss this opportunity to connect with people from around the globe as the world comes to Rexburg for a week.

Grand Targhee Music Festivals

The Tetons make a sweeping backdrop for the summer music festivals at Grand Targhee Resort. Every year, the resort hosts Targhee Fest and the Grand Targhee Bluegrass Festival, which take place in a gorgeous high alpine setting. Festival goers can find lodging and camping conveniently located nearby, with options ranging from camping to RV parks, vacation rentals, and mountainside lodges. Between sets, enjoy hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, and other activities at the resort.

BYU-Idaho Planetarium

BYU-Idaho's Royden G. Derrick Planetarium is mainly used for university classes, but it also offers public weekend shows in addition to hosting community groups. Located on the fourth floor of the Eyring Science Center, it offers wonderful opportunities for people to learn about and enjoy the cosmos. Be sure to check the planetarium's calendar for upcoming events and opportunities.

Idaho Centennial Carousel

Ride a historical relic in Rexburg's Porter Park. The Idaho Centennial Carousel is the state's only antique wooden carousel (and one of only 170 similar carousels in the entire country). It has authentic carousel music playing from an organ which runs on paper rolls, providing old-fashioned original sounds.

 

Built by Spillman Engineering Company of New York around 1926, the carousel was used as a traveling carnival ride and moved around frequently. In 1947, it was moved to Liberty Park in Salt Lake City, Utah, and then on to Ogden, Utah, before being brought to Rexburg in 1952. Over two decades later, the 1976 Teton Dam flood severely damaged the carousel, but it was disassembled and restored in 1988. By 1990, it was fully renovated and ready for the state's centennial—which is how the carousel earned its distinctive moniker.

 

It is still in use today, and visitors can ride it. It is typically open every day of the week (except Sundays) from Memorial Day through Labor Day. Be sure to check hours and days of operation.